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Gratitude Revisited

I couldn’t let this year end without revisiting the theme of gratitude, which became an important focus this year for my family, for camp, and for myself personally.   While I have some free time over this holiday week, I want to refocus on gratitude and rededicate myself to some of my own gratitude practices, which have unfortunately been lagging over these past few months.  I love the example of the 365 Gratitude Project (video above), which many people have taken on as a gratitude practice.

1000gifts_revised-1 Here’s a quick recap of my “year of gratitude”: In January, I read the book 1000 Gifts by Anna Voscamp and subsequently downloaded her app of the same name for my iphone.   In February, I spoke to Christine Carter about her training for our camp staff, and we settled on gratitude as her topic.  In March, we made gratitude journals as a family activity, which we used sporadically in April and May.  In June, we kicked off our summer of gratitude at camp with Christine’s training.   July and August were filled with gratitude practices at camp like sharing things we are grateful for at our nightly campfires.  A Simple Act of Gratitude: How Learning to Say IMG_6222Thank You Changed my Life by John Kralik was my September read.  In October, I read the book How Children Succeed (Paul Tough) and learned that gratitude is one of the seven most important qualities we can instill in our children to help them succeed in life.  So, as you can see, this gratitude theme just kept popping up over and over for me this year!

But, alas, despite all this reading and talk about gratitude, I haven’t been successful in maintaining all the many gratitude habits I started in 2012.  In January, I enthusiastically downloaded the 1000 Gifts app and started keeping track of my daily gifts, but, as happens with many of my projects, the early enthusiasm wore off and I, unfortunately, stopped keeping track after a few weeks.  Now seeing the app on my phone is just a reminder of my failure to get to 1000.  I’m stuck at 136.  Each time I whisk over the app on my way to the IMG_0315weather app, I’m reminded of my failure to count 1000 gifts.    The journals we so carefully crafted in March are gathering dust on the hutch in the dining room.   But, rather than beat myself over my lack of follow through, I’m resolving this week to regroup and focus on a simple, realistic plan for keeping gratitude in my daily lifa-simple-act-gratitude-how-learning-say-thank-john-kralik-paperback-cover-arte in 2013.

“Want happy kids?  You go first,” Carter says in her book Raising Happiness.  Applying her statement to gratitude, since it applies to all the qualities we model for our kids, I say, “If I want grateful kids, I need to go first.” And I’m enlisting some help by taking the free 21-day class Carter is offering starting January 1 called  “Cracking the Habit Code”.

Creative Ways for Kids to Write Thank Yous
I love these ideas for having kids express gratitude (other than just writing notes!)

Give Your Kids the Gift of Gratitude

Christine Carter Gratitude Links (blog posts, podcasts)

Thank you for reading!

2 comments on “Gratitude Revisited

  1. “This is hardly failure Sunshine!” Like all people looking to train and change my co-workers for the better, I am grateful if I am partially successful. This still falls under the category of success, and I am sure that Anna Voscamp would consider anyone who moves forward with the notion of a thousand gifts and partially gets there as a success. Are you not 136 gifts ahead of where you could have been? More like more than that, just 136 ‘noted’ gifts.
    Thank you for the read.
    007

    • Thanks for the encouragement, 007! You’re right. I’m 136 gifts ahead, not 864 behind! Way to look at the bright side — I’m grateful for your comment, so that can be 137. :) Happy 2013!

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